Game Search




Forum Search

Achievement Guide
Silent Hill 2
"Hard to Hit"

Receive less than 500 points...
 
Pages: [1] 2
 Print 

Author Topic: How do I listen to the music and have it not picked up  (Read 6117 times)
Aspie Retrogamer
Average Player


Posts: 311
Videos: 2,816
Guides: 805

351,846 gold
Give Gold
HomuMado forever!!!


View Profile
« on: July 25, 2014, 01:37:39 AM »

I am currently using Camtasia to add the commentary track to my playthroughs. The problem here is that when I want to do a live commentary, the music gets picked up too, and I am less motivated when I have to turn the volume off to record my voice. How is it possible for me to listen to the in-game sounds and have those not picked up?

I started my first playthrough on July 17, 2013 and by the end of June 2014, managed to make a whopping 170 episodes. Do you think that it is too fast, and should I slow down in the amount of episodes made?
Logged


If it moves, kill it!

With kindness comes naïveté. Courage becomes foolhardiness. And dedication has no reward. If you can't accept any of that, you are not fit to be a magical girl, and if you are not a magical girl, you can't control the past. He who can't control the past cannot command the future, and he who is unable to command the future cannot conquer the past.

I was a North American Fall Webworm in my past life. Those were the good ol' days. What were you in your former life?

Glorified Tree
Director
Full Player


Posts: 757
Videos: 1,658
Guides: 46

37,884 gold
Give Gold
Barking up the wrong tree!


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2014, 01:58:38 AM »

Wear headphones...? I thought it was common knowledge to wear them when you record. <_<
Logged

To be a tree your bark has to be worse than your bite.



Aspie Retrogamer
Average Player


Posts: 311
Videos: 2,816
Guides: 805

351,846 gold
Give Gold
HomuMado forever!!!


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2014, 03:58:40 AM »

recording from the pc, and the sound recorder picks up everything that goes through, resulting in contamination
Logged


If it moves, kill it!

With kindness comes naïveté. Courage becomes foolhardiness. And dedication has no reward. If you can't accept any of that, you are not fit to be a magical girl, and if you are not a magical girl, you can't control the past. He who can't control the past cannot command the future, and he who is unable to command the future cannot conquer the past.

I was a North American Fall Webworm in my past life. Those were the good ol' days. What were you in your former life?

Semi-Noob


Posts: 47
Videos: 176
Guides: 4

15,954 gold
Give Gold

View Profile
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2014, 08:18:14 AM »

Compress the vocal track and put the noise floor above the music; this will isolate your vocals for volume increase. When you later overlay the vocals over the game, the game sound on the vocal track will still be present, but be much quieter than the game's sound. If they're in sync, you won't hear it. And the fact that it is present will make it easier to sync up.

Or just wear headphones after getting your reference noise.

We don't wear headphones since we do two-person commentary. We also edit the vocals to silence when we aren't talking, depends how much effort you want to put into it.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2014, 11:35:54 AM by CorrosiveTruths » Logged

Check out my Let's Play of Silent Hill 4: The Room.

1080p widescreen with corrected aspect ratio (no stretching). Also in Pro Logic 2 surround, because someone told me you can't.
Glorified Tree
Director
Full Player


Posts: 757
Videos: 1,658
Guides: 46

37,884 gold
Give Gold
Barking up the wrong tree!


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2014, 12:44:09 PM »

Compress the vocal track and put the noise floor above the music; this will isolate your vocals for volume increase. When you later overlay the vocals over the game, the game sound on the vocal track will still be present, but be much quieter than the game's sound. If they're in sync, you won't hear it. And the fact that it is present will make it easier to sync up.

Or just wear headphones after getting your reference noise.

We don't wear headphones since we do two-person commentary. We also edit the vocals to silence when we aren't talking, depends how much effort you want to put into it.



I wouldn't really advise compression, if you can avoid it...

 Also, you can both wear headphones and still hear each other. So I don't know why you wouldn't wear them when doing dual commentary.

@Warblefly, Just turn the in-game audio pick up off in your recorder's settings...or have your recorder record them to seperate audio streams.
Logged

To be a tree your bark has to be worse than your bite.



Semi-Noob


Posts: 47
Videos: 176
Guides: 4

15,954 gold
Give Gold

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2014, 01:11:17 PM »



I wouldn't really advise compression, if you can avoid it...

 Also, you can both wear headphones and still hear each other. So I don't know why you wouldn't wear them when doing dual commentary.

@Warblefly, Just turn the in-game audio pick up off in your recorder's settings...or have your recorder record them to seperate audio streams.

Compressing vocal-only tracks is fairly standard practice, why on earth would you advise against it?

I'm sure we could direct the vocals through the headphones; or we could just not wear them. Why bother if they aren't needed?
recording from the pc, and the sound recorder picks up everything that goes through, resulting in contamination
Anyway, I assumed you were already recording your vocals separately?
Logged

Check out my Let's Play of Silent Hill 4: The Room.

1080p widescreen with corrected aspect ratio (no stretching). Also in Pro Logic 2 surround, because someone told me you can't.
Glorified Tree
Director
Full Player


Posts: 757
Videos: 1,658
Guides: 46

37,884 gold
Give Gold
Barking up the wrong tree!


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2014, 01:41:53 PM »

Compressing vocal-only tracks is fairly standard practice, why on earth would you advise against it?

I'm sure we could direct the vocals through the headphones; or we could just not wear them. Why bother if they aren't needed?Anyway, I assumed you were already recording your vocals separately?

It's standard... If you were recording a CD. You aren't singing, FYI.

They aren't needed?  Most people would die from the infinite feedback loop first, though, so it's pretty well needed.
Logged

To be a tree your bark has to be worse than your bite.



Semi-Noob


Posts: 47
Videos: 176
Guides: 4

15,954 gold
Give Gold

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2014, 02:00:54 PM »

It's standard... If you were recording a CD. You aren't singing, FYI.

They aren't needed?  Most people would die from the infinite feedback loop first, though, so it's pretty well needed.

Yes, you can really hear that deadly feedback in my videos. You don't know what you're talking about.

But er, yes, back to the topic at hand, compression is useful for evening out vocals and has a noise floor so background noises are less obvious.

The audacity wiki has a nice explanation "Noise Floor: The compressor adjusts the gain on audio below this background level so as to prevent it being unduly amplified in processing. This is mainly useful when compressing speech, to prevent the gain increasing during pauses and so over-amplifying the background noise."

Funnily enough, I do occasionally sing when playing games.
Logged

Check out my Let's Play of Silent Hill 4: The Room.

1080p widescreen with corrected aspect ratio (no stretching). Also in Pro Logic 2 surround, because someone told me you can't.
Glorified Tree
Director
Full Player


Posts: 757
Videos: 1,658
Guides: 46

37,884 gold
Give Gold
Barking up the wrong tree!


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2014, 04:58:54 PM »

Yes, you can really hear that deadly feedback in my videos. You don't know what you're talking about.

But er, yes, back to the topic at hand, compression is useful for evening out vocals and has a noise floor so background noises are less obvious.

The audacity wiki has a nice explanation "Noise Floor: The compressor adjusts the gain on audio below this background level so as to prevent it being unduly amplified in processing. This is mainly useful when compressing speech, to prevent the gain increasing during pauses and so over-amplifying the background noise."

Funnily enough, I do occasionally sing when playing games.

I didn't say I could hear feedback... I said that real microhpones can cause feedback loops if you have them within proximity to your speakers, this isn't even counting that it could pick up your in-game audio if, it's too loud.

There are things you could improve upon, and you wouldn't need to compress in the first place.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2014, 07:24:02 PM by DukeVerde » Logged

To be a tree your bark has to be worse than your bite.



Semi-Noob


Posts: 47
Videos: 176
Guides: 4

15,954 gold
Give Gold

View Profile
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2014, 08:36:56 PM »

I didn't say I could hear feedback... I said that real microhpones can cause feedback loops if you have them within proximity to your speakers, this isn't even counting that it could pick up your in-game audio if, it's too loud.

There are things you could improve upon, and you wouldn't need to compress in the first place.

No, that isn't what you said, and would only come into play if you are sending the microphone to the speakers, which would be pointless since we aren't wearing headphones and can hear ourselves just fine.

So your argument against using a compressor is that if you don't need one, you don't need one, and that one use of a compressor is that professionally produced music has compression on the singing?
Logged

Check out my Let's Play of Silent Hill 4: The Room.

1080p widescreen with corrected aspect ratio (no stretching). Also in Pro Logic 2 surround, because someone told me you can't.
 
Pages: [1] 2
 Print 

 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Page created in 0.05 seconds with 17 queries.