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Author Topic: Tutorial: Upscaling 480i to 720p Sony Vegas  (Read 50663 times)
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« on: November 14, 2012, 05:52:45 PM »

So I decided to make a tutorial on how to upscale a 480i quality game to 720p in Sony Vegas step by step. As this is my first tutorial I'll try my best to make it as simple as possible without being complicated.

So to start here is a little information about what we're doing...

We're going to turn a 480i ( "i" meaning interlaced) video into a 720p ( "p" being Progressive) video which in lame man's terms we are  "upscaling" or "upconverting" a  standard definition video to a high resolution video, or high definition video, whatever tickles your fancy.

So to start when you open Sony Vegas (I have version 12.0) and find your project properties, Choose HDV 720-30p (1280x720, 29.97 fps) [Or anything close to this template]



What you want to notice is, the Deinterlace method is "None", so when you watch it in the preview you'll see this (Set it to Good or Best to Notice)



So what we want to do here is tweak the Default Template in the Project Properties [First Image] to this revised Template [Image Below]



The Field order is set to 'Upper Field First" [It can still be None (Progressive Scan) its better to match it to your raw video] and the Deinterlace Method is set to "Interpolate fields" So when you watch your preview this time (Set it to Good or Best to Notice)



Ok so you've done all your editing in your video and your ready to render it, you'll want to go to File---> Render As and customize a template (Preferably the one i've highlighted)



as you customize your template it should look something like this



What matter's in Video is that "Field Order: Upper Field First" [Or None (Progressive Scan) again it's better to match your raw video, but still its whatever you feel like picking ] is what it's set to.
As for Audio,and Project I have mine set to "Best" even though "Good" is virtually the same

Afterwards Render your video and view your finished product.

If you've followed everything Congratulation's  you've successfully upscaled/upconverted your video from 480i to 720p !

To show a side by side comparison Top (Named Test 0) is if you rendered it with the Default Template and Bottom (Named Upscale Test 480i to 720p) being the Template we created and basically what we're trying to accomplish.


Watch in HD to notice results
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« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2012, 06:29:18 PM »

Look, I see you put a lot of work into this, but this is a terrible idea. We really need to put a stop to this horrible idea that upscaling 480i to "HD" is acceptable. You aren't creating or producing HD content, you're stretching 480i content (which, in your example, also includes stretching a 4:3 image to 16:9 widescreen, which is also completely unacceptable by any reasonable quality standards) to a fake HD resolution to catch the attention of ignorant people that don't know any better and aren't likely to change the resolution from its default in-page res anyway.
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« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2012, 07:28:48 PM »

Look, I see you put a lot of work into this, but this is a terrible idea. We really need to put a stop to this horrible idea that upscaling 480i to "HD" is acceptable. You aren't creating or producing HD content, you're stretching 480i content (which, in your example, also includes stretching a 4:3 image to 16:9 widescreen, which is also completely unacceptable by any reasonable quality standards) to a fake HD resolution to catch the attention of ignorant people that don't know any better and aren't likely to change the resolution from its default in-page res anyway.
I agree with the stretching. It's a bad idea. Notice how Snake is about as wide as he is tall. That's an aspect ratio problem, but the resolution is fine so long as it's not the actual game resolution but the video. Vegas will add black borders itself.

I took this example using snipping tool so the size isn't true, but the borders and stretching illustrates my example well enough.
The first is 4:3, which is true to PSX, but with the borders, it can rendered as 720. This is useful because both youtube and GA's uploader will allow higher bitrates (quality) when uploading a 720 video over a 480, even if it's not 720. This post explains it better...
"The codecs YouTube uses when converting uploaded videos for anything below 720 vertical lines is kind of bad, so my advice would be to make sure your video has over 720 vertical lines to get the 720p encode. I know it's stupid, but that's just how YouTube works."

Uploading at 4:3 will make youtube and GA add borders anyway because they display widescreen, so you might as well have vegas add them in and get that bump in quality (it's a noticeable bump).




Notice how the Square button on-screen is wider than it is tall in the second pic, but perfectly symmetrical as it's supposed to be in the first.

Basically, Snake should look like this.


Also instead of using Vegas' built-in deinterlacer, there's a port of yadif for Vegas you should give a try.
http://www.yohng.com/software/yadifvegas.html

Using it, I got these results which I think look damn good. Didn't adjust anything other than add the yadif codec to the video.
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« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2012, 02:32:53 AM »

Nice tutorial but I would have to say I would prefer Kurants way just because of the aspect ratio problem.
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« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2012, 10:03:40 PM »

This...was helpful Smiley
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« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2012, 01:05:37 AM »

Look, I see you put a lot of work into this, but this is a terrible idea. We really need to put a stop to this horrible idea that upscaling 480i to "HD" is acceptable. You aren't creating or producing HD content, you're stretching 480i content (which, in your example, also includes stretching a 4:3 image to 16:9 widescreen, which is also completely unacceptable by any reasonable quality standards) to a fake HD resolution to catch the attention of ignorant people that don't know any better and aren't likely to change the resolution from its default in-page res anyway.

First off, his ultimate goal isn't to fool users into thinking it's HD, because let's face it, with a 480i input it will never be HD. What it does though is remove interlacing and allows a less "blurry" image in youtube's video player and many others due to compression. (if a 360p video is played in the 360p option in youtube, it's going to look extremely blurry and like crap, even though that is its native resolution. If you upscaled to 480p, it's going to look the exact same but take advantage of the video player and remove the compression that youtube and many other video players do. Same with upscaling to 720p, even 480p uses some level of compression, it's meant for slower internet.) Also, black bars are severe eye cancer to a lot of people including myself, and they're also a great way to cause screen burn-in over time for many users who like to watch things full screen. 4:3 is meant for 4:3 TVs and monitors. Stretching to 16:9 to fit a 16:9 monitor/tv is perfectly acceptable in my eyes, because it's taking advantage of the entire screen, and removing negative effects. Your nostalgia might tell you it's wrong, but you get used to it over time, and it honestly isn't so bad.
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« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2012, 09:44:48 PM »

Uploading at 4:3 will make youtube and GA add borders anyway because they display widescreen, so you might as well have vegas add them in and get that bump in quality (it's a noticeable bump).

The borders won't be there in fullscreen if the viewer's monitor is the same aspect ratio as the video. What you're suggesting here results in 16:10 videos, 5:4 videos, and 4:3 videos being displayed as tiny boxes surrounded by black on non-16:9 monitors, which is hardly ideal. Not everyone is running 16:9, mind you. Should they be screwed over because they aren't using what's considered "standard" these days? No.
Unless GA's encoding has changed since the last time I uploaded an exclusive video back in April, GA's the only website you mentioned that would need to have black bars added, simply because last time I checked (which, again, was back in April, so I may be on outdated info here), it stretched 4:3 videos to widescreen.

Besides, it isn't hard at all to make a custom rendering template in Vegas, Movie Maker, etc. to account for non-16:9 aspect ratios(though you're doomed to run into trouble with Movie maker for non-16:9/4:3 aspect ratios).

First off, his ultimate goal isn't to fool users into thinking it's HD, because let's face it, with a 480i input it will never be HD. What it does though is remove interlacing and allows a less "blurry" image in youtube's video player and many others due to compression. (if a 360p video is played in the 360p option in youtube, it's going to look extremely blurry and like crap, even though that is its native resolution. If you upscaled to 480p, it's going to look the exact same but take advantage of the video player and remove the compression that youtube and many other video players do. Same with upscaling to 720p, even 480p uses some level of compression, it's meant for slower internet.) Also, black bars are severe eye cancer to a lot of people including myself, and they're also a great way to cause screen burn-in over time for many users who like to watch things full screen. 4:3 is meant for 4:3 TVs and monitors. Stretching to 16:9 to fit a 16:9 monitor/tv is perfectly acceptable in my eyes, because it's taking advantage of the entire screen, and removing negative effects. Your nostalgia might tell you it's wrong, but you get used to it over time, and it honestly isn't so bad.

I'm well aware of youtube's sub-par bitrate settings for sub-HD resolutions, but let's face it: sitting far away on a couch or recliner aside, even the HD bitrates aren't up to snuff for videos faster-paced than the average television show or 24-25 FPS motion-blur-fest film. That doesn't mean you should stretch a video to a large size just because the bitrate's slightly less awful there. In a more perfect world, youtube would expand the "original resolution" viewing option to cover all video resolutions, render each preset and "original resolution" with higher bitrate values.

Now, if it's, for example, 1024x576, 1024x600, 800x600, 960x540, 400x300, 800x450, etc, that's fine to upscale in my book as those are reasonably close to the next highest viewing preset on youtube and don't have their own pre-set resolution viewing option.



As for your comment about black bars....

For one, I hope you and "a lot of people" weren't around when the average TV and computer monitor was a 4:3 CRT, because the letterboxed widescreen would probably give you an aneurysm, the way you're describing it. Unless you're using an awful Plasma display or very early LCDs, your screen isn't going to "burn-in" the black bars that surround an aspect ratio-correct video feed on a monitor with a non-matching aspect ratio. Personally, I'd rather have unused screen space than a stretched, distorted image that makes my eyes hurt almost as bad as 3D glasses.

Removing negative effects? A correct aspect ratio is not a negative effect, it is good production values. Stretching an image is bad production values, akin to game or microphone audio clipping or being filled with static. Whether on a professional or hobby level, one should strive to provide the highest quality production values they can muster so their viewers can enjoy quality videos.


Nostalgia hasn't got a thing to do with any part of this opposition, by the way. It's simply a matter of quality standards, production values, and feeling compelled to oppose something that goes against these things.
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« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2012, 12:02:46 AM »

Should they be screwed over because they aren't using what's considered "standard" these days? No.
Yes. Yes they should. Appealing to the majority gives you the best return.
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« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2012, 03:35:44 AM »

As for your comment about black bars....

For one, I hope you and "a lot of people" weren't around when the average TV and computer monitor was a 4:3 CRT, because the letterboxed widescreen would probably give you an aneurysm, the way you're describing it.

I don't think attacking my age or preferences is making your case look any better. I had a CRT TV/Monitor until I was 15, thank you. And yes, black bars are very annoying. That unused black space is an eye sore. Are you one of those people that would put a crt and color filter over SNES emulation? Because newsflash, that doesn't look appealing. The only reason why it looked that way back in the day was thanks to the limits of the technology. Same with 4:3, we're moving to a new industry standard here.

Yes. Yes they should. Appealing to the majority gives you the best return.

Also, quoting for truth. Just because you don't like it or have outdated equipment, doesn't make you the majority.

I've said all I have to here. This was a tutorial for those who want to use this idea, if you don't like it, continue to make videos the way you do. There's a reason why people do this and I have already explained it.
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« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2012, 04:43:53 AM »

Look, I see you put a lot of work into this, but this is a terrible idea. We really need to put a stop to this horrible idea that upscaling 480i to "HD" is acceptable. You aren't creating or producing HD content, you're stretching 480i content (which, in your example, also includes stretching a 4:3 image to 16:9 widescreen, which is also completely unacceptable by any reasonable quality standards) to a fake HD resolution to catch the attention of ignorant people that don't know any better and aren't likely to change the resolution from its default in-page res anyway.

Removing negative effects? A correct aspect ratio is not a negative effect, it is good production values. Stretching an image is bad production values, akin to game or microphone audio clipping or being filled with static. Whether on a professional or hobby level, one should strive to provide the highest quality production values they can muster so their viewers can enjoy quality videos.


Nostalgia hasn't got a thing to do with any part of this opposition, by the way. It's simply a matter of quality standards, production values, and feeling compelled to oppose something that goes against these things.


From me to you friend, I appreciate what your saying but to be honest i didn't think this was gonna blow up into this little argument your having with people here.

To be honest when I saw what's been going on in this topic i couldn't help but find it amusing.

So how bout, you figure out a way to produce a video of the highest quality standards, for 480i and older consoles without the black bars?



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